Category: Uncategorized

what-is-brown-sequard-syndrome ?what-is-brown-sequard-syndrome ?

Brown-Séquard syndrome (BSS) is a rare neurological condition that happens when damage to your spinal cord causes muscle weakness or paralysis on one side of your body and a loss of sensation on the opposite side. The damage occurs on only one side of your spinal cord in a specific area. Your spinal cord is a cylindrical structure that runs through the center of your spine, from your brainstem to your low back. It’s a delicate structure that contains nerve bundles and cells that carry messages from your brain to the rest of your body and vice versa. Your spinal cord is one of the main parts of your nervous system. Brown-Séquard syndrome is considered an incomplete spinal cord injury (SCI), meaning there’s partial preservation of sensory function, motor function or a combination of both below where the injury occurred on your spinal cord. A complete SCI results in the loss of all sensory and voluntary motor functions below the level of the injury. BSS has several possible causes, but the most common cause is trauma — typically penetrating trauma such as a gunshot or stab wound. Inflammation or pinching of your spinal cord can also cause BSS occasionally. Brown-Séquard syndrome is named after scientist Charles-Édouard Brown-Séquard, who first described it in 1849. What is the difference between central cord syndrome and Brown-Séquard syndrome? Central cord syndrome (CCS) and Brown-Séquard syndrome (BSS) are both incomplete spinal cord injuries, but they’re distinct conditions. CCS is an incomplete traumatic injury to the center of your spinal cord, usually in your neck. This injury results in weakness in your arms that is worse than in your legs. BSS results from an incomplete spinal cord injury anywhere along your spine, and it causes weakness or paralysis on one side of your body and a loss of sensation on the other side below where the injury is. Who does Brown-Séquard syndrome affect? Brown-Séquard syndrome can affect anyone, though it’s a rare condition. It affects people assigned female at birth and people assigned male at birth in equal numbers. How common is Brown-Séquard syndrome? Brown-Séquard syndrome is a rare condition. Approximately 12,000 new cases of traumatic spinal cord injuries happen each year in the United States, and Brown-Séquard syndrome is estimated to result from 2% to 4% of these cases. SYMPTOMS AND CAUSES What are the symptoms of Brown-Séquard syndrome? Symptoms of Brown-Séquard syndrome (BSS) usually appear after you experience spinal cord injury that causes damage on only one side of your spinal cord in a specific area anywhere along your spine. The first symptoms of BSS are usually: Loss of voluntary motor function (muscle movement) on the same side of your body as the spinal cord damage below the level of the injury. This could present as weakness or paralysis. Loss of pain and temperature sensation on the other side of your body below the level of the injury. ...

whipple-s-diseasewhipple-s-disease

OverviewWhipple disease is a rare bacterial infection that most often affects your joints and digestive system. Whipple disease interferes with normal digestion by impairing the breakdown of foods, and hampering your body’s ability to absorb nutrients, such as fats and carbohydrates. Whipple disease can also infect other organs, including your brain, heart and eyes. Without proper treatment, Whipple disease can be serious or fatal. However, a course of antibiotics can treat Whipple disease. Symptoms Common signs and symptoms Digestive signs and symptoms are common in Whipple disease and may include: Diarrhea Stomach cramping and pain, which may worsen after meals Weight loss, associated with the malabsorption of nutrients Other frequent signs and symptoms associated with Whipple disease include: Inflamed joints, particularly the ankles, knees and wrists Fatigue Weakness Anemia Less common signs and symptoms In some cases, signs and symptoms of Whipple disease may include: Fever Cough Enlarged lymph nodes Skin darkening in areas exposed to the sun and in scars ...

blepharospasmblepharospasm

What is blepharospasm? Blepharospasm is a neurologic disorder that causes uncontrollable muscle movements that causes the eyelids to close or have difficulty opening (dystonia). This can affect patients’ ability to see. How common is blepharospasm? It is a rare disease and is (like sometimes difficult to diagnose. Approximately 2,000 people are diagnosed with it each year. How does blepharospasm affect my body? Symptoms start with uncontrollable eyelid twitching (spasms) that comes and goes. It usually starts gradually and gets worse over time. As the disease progresses, you may experience constant blinking, and the opening between your eyelids may narrow. In advanced cases of blepharospasm, you may not be able to keep your eyes open or may be difficult to open your eyes. Will blepharospasm cause me to become blind? Blepharospasm does not affect your vision, but it can lead to functional blindness. When you cannot keep your eyes open, it limits your ability to perform daily tasks. SYMPTOMS AND CAUSES What causes blepharospasm? Researchers are still working to confirm its cause. Blepharospasm may be due to abnormal electrical activity in the basal ganglia, structures deep within the brain that help control movement. Who gets blepharospasm? Usually people get blepharospasm in middle age, but it can happen to anyone. Sometimes dry eye may look like blepharospasm so it is important to see your healthcare provider to rule out other causes for your excessive blinking. You could also experience blepharospasm if you take certain medications. For example, medications for Parkinson’s disease can cause blepharospasm. People with certain medical conditions can get blepharospasm. These conditions include: General Dystonia. Meige syndrome. Tardive dyskinesia. Wilson disease. What are the symptoms of blepharospasm? In the early stages, you may have frequent blinking and the symptoms come and go. You’ll experience them during the day, and they’ll go away while you are sleeping. As the disease progresses, they become more severe with fewer periods of relief. ...

waldenstrom-macroglobulinemiawaldenstrom-macroglobulinemia

Overview Waldenstrom macroglobulinemia is a rare type of cancer that begins in the white blood cells. If you have Waldenstrom macroglobulinemia, your bone marrow produces too many abnormal white blood cells that crowd out healthy blood cells. The abnormal white blood cells produce a protein that accumulates in the blood, impairs circulation and causes complications. Waldenstrom macroglobulinemia is considered a type of non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma. It’s sometimes called lymphoplasmacytic lymphoma. Symptoms Waldenstrom macroglobulinemia is slow growing and may not cause signs and symptoms for many years. When they do occur, signs and symptoms may include: Easy bruising Bleeding from the nose or the gums Fatigue Weight loss Numbness in your hands or feet Fever Headache Shortness of breath Changes in vision Confusion Causes It’s not clear what causes Waldenstrom macroglobulinemia. Doctors know that the disease begins with one abnormal white blood cell that develops errors (mutations) in its genetic code. The errors tell the cell to continue multiplying rapidly. ...